About BiteSizeCanada

screenshot_20190823_103552I write little bite size tidbits of Canadian history and trivia. Each post takes just a few minutes at most to read. A great way to learn and hopefully is a stepping stone to wanting to learn more!

For more Canadian trivia and history (and even some unique puzzles) why not visit BiteSizeCanada’s website.

360 comments

  1. Hah, today I’ve started BYTE-SIZED STORIES in my blog and then I suddenly find……. Bite Size Canada :). Wish me luck for my blog buddy.

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  2. Thank you for visiting my blog and checking out my post on Charlesbourg! As a blogging newbie and a U.S. historian, it means an awful lot to get a nod from you on my first foray into Canadian historical geography. I’m glad to have found BiteSizeCanada and look forward to more “bites”!

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    • Yes, well, I should have checked your blog a bit closely … I absolutely enjoy it! You seem excited about getting your hands on old documents, as do I! I did indeed enjoy your piece on New France, but I see you have way more goodies, too! πŸ™‚

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  3. So as not to detract from the story of a millionaire miner dying penniless – but also not wanting to fail to offer a couple of tid-bits you might want to pursue – I come to this page to mention two stories I like and consider rascal stories: the criminal Albert Johnson (Mad Trapper from Rat River); and the very different (from Albert) story of the Bedaux “Canadian Subarctic” Expedition.

    Oh! I guess I know of 3 – just thought of Grey Owl, (Archibald Belany)! Belany was not a rascal. … I’d best quit, memories of favorite tales of Canadian history might start rolling in. (Thinking of Grey Owl reminds me of the sad plight of the Beothuk people, which reminds me of Louis Riel …, …, …)
    πŸ™‚

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    • Wow, I’m glad I was able to evoke such memories! The first two stories I’m not positive I know. The others, yes, but realize that they are good stories to post. Thank you for the reminder!
      Please feel free to distract anytime, anywhere! I love it! πŸ™‚

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      • I may run out of ideas soon – could find memories settling into localized, or at best regional anecdotes but will share what comes to mind if it’s a story that gained any ‘traction’ in larger public interest. One more however that’s intrigued me for years, that I’ve had little luck pinning down solid details on, relates to a coastal tribe at time Brits were settling in. Not sure what tribe, but think it on Canada side of border.

        Long ago while visiting a friend (in Portland Or) and wanting something to do one afternoon I found in her library a small ‘regional history’ volume that described a practice of ‘clowning’ that was common in the tribe. Clowning was a way the society had of challenging anyone who took their authority too seriously and behaved as if ‘superior’ to everyone else.

        If a chief, for instance, behaved this way, anyone in the society could decide the chief had gone too far and begin to ‘clown’ him. This would mean dressing to imitate but with ridiculous touches to costume, and following the chief about. There might be only one ‘clown’ or others might join in. Clowning would continue until the (chief in this made-up example) began to show some humility toward self and greater respect toward others.

        It was possible for a ‘clown’ to also fall prey to egoistic self-importance, so it was also possible for a clown to be clowned!

        There was at least one anecdote told in the history of a number of tribal villagers showing up at an Anglican service (they’d all been encouraged to convert, of course). It’s the Anglican angle that makes me think it a Canadian service. Some of the villagers had decided the priest needed clowning – can’t recall enough details of how they dressed to make their point but remember I thought it was pretty funny.

        I’ve tried a few times to dig through internet and find references to this practice but have not found reference to the book, (whose title and author I’ve never remembered). And have not found descriptions that quite match.

        There are times I so regret loss of this practice, and regret it did not ‘catch on’ more broadly. I can see elements of this kind of mockery in society in many situations – but nothing quite so wonderful as my imagined sense of how ‘clowning’ worked! (Have no idea what the practice would have been called in the tribe’s language -not ‘clowning’ of course.)

        .. oh dear, reminds me of an anthropologist study of tribal society in western interior boreal forests … perhaps another time. Interested me because it challenges “tribalism” as a concept of ‘tight exclusive social system’…. Must move along! Glad I’ve a place to deposit these tidbits!

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        • …quick addition to ‘clowning’ – as I recall, it was more than absurd mimicry of dress. The clown might also mimic posture and other mannerisms.

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  4. Growing up in the US, I found my way to Canada without much “pre-planning” and found myself a de facto ‘ex-pat’ American living in Canada. After some decades, I’m back in the US, and find myself significantly an ‘ex-pat’ Canadian living in the US! Your site is a welcome, welcome spa.

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  5. Thanks for liking my post “Tilted.” I look forward to reading your tidbits, as I like learning about our neighbor, in my case neighbor to the south and east. We spend a lot of time in southern Mexico, and have laughed about the fact that we have made friends with many Canadians in Mexico, but have never met one here. I guess along about November we have similar ideas…

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  6. Just popped over to say thanks so much for liking the post ‘The Origins of MM’. Hopefully there will be more stuff on my blog that you will like. Best wishes, MM πŸ€

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  7. Thanks for stopping by and liking the Photo of the Day. I find myself staring Billie Holiday’s picture all the time. She had a kind of charisma that could really pull you in.

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  8. Hey there my friend!! I have good news for you….I have nominated you for the β€œBest Moment Award.” The reason I nominated you for the award is because I think that your blog is worthy enough to receive the award and that other people should have the opportunity to enjoy your blog. Congratulations! I hope that this award will help brighten your day in some way! You can visit my site and check it out! β€œGood Time Stories” http://goodtimestories.wordpress.com/2013/07/13/best-moment-award

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    • Thanks, Coach! I do appreciate the award. I enjoy your blog as well! It may take me a few days, but I’ll check it out and “nominate” as well! Thank you! πŸ™‚

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  9. Thx for liking my blog. I was in Canada for the first time visiting my cousins in Ashcroft in 2002. I got into so much trouble with my Australian accent and slang expressions my cousin said we are two countries separated by the same language. After working hard all day using an air compressor to blow the water out of all the garden watering systems I told the girls at the bar I was knocked up (means tired in Aussie) I was known as the pregnant Aussie from that day on. Had my water broke yet? Playing pool I was told to put a loonie in the coin slot. Where was I going to find a lunatic that would fit I asked. After the first minus degree autumn day I told them it didnt get that cold in my refrigerator back home on the Gold Coast.

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    • Heehee … Sounds like fun! “Knocked up” … I like that! Funny how so many local phrases make up our language, eh? Don’t forget to salute us with your first cup of tea or coffee in the morning! πŸ™‚

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  10. How refreshing! Your blog is just a breathe of fresh air for those who hate reading long posts! I write long posts sometimes! Thanks for checking into my blog!

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    • I find a few of my posts a little long, but I do try to put in an effort to “cut it down”, especially if I can send the reader to a site that explains something in more detail. That’s the hardest part for me: cutting it down!
      I quite enjoy your blog, and i don’t think the posts are too long! And besides, let’s “educate” people about Canada! Hahaha πŸ™‚

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  11. Thank you for visiting my very eclectic blog……….Although I am English I have a strong affinity with Lithuania. Nice idea with your blog. Keep up the good work.

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  12. Love, love, love your idea of bite-size Canada and very much look forward to now following our adopted country’s history – thank you – and hey, thanks so much liking my little blog “mumhowmuchlonger.com”. πŸ™‚

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  13. Thanks for liking my little hockey blogpost. Love your site, by the way. I’m really into learning about history and your bite-sized approach is pretty cool. Great idea.

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  14. thanks for liking my post,and i am humbled to find you..thats a great way to show love for your country..keep posting..

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  15. I wanted to drop a quick note to a handful of my most loyal followers, you being one of them, and say thank you. I started blogging somewhat reluctantly but have come to really enjoy it primarily because of bloggers like you. You have been a litmus test for many of my posts and if I see your like pop up, I know I must be doing something right. πŸ˜‰ And not that I ever could improve your blog but if you ever need a custom graphic or musical suggestion, I’m your man. Thanks again. – Kelly

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    • Thank you, Kelly! You’re no slouch either, you know. Yes, you are doing right: reason for my likes!

      I will indeed keep you in mind! πŸ™‚

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  16. Thank you for liking my post. And now I see that you blog about Canada, I will follow yours. I recently spent a weeks in Montreal and Quebec City and loved it. Eager to learn more about Canada.

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  17. My Canadian history favourite is the French Fortress at Louisburg Cape Breton NS. Well worth a visit. Thanks for visiting my blog.

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  18. I’m a stones throw from The Canadian border [less than a day] and have traveled across some very inviting country, I am also a history buff. Always interested in the goings-on north of the boarder. Thanks for the Like on history up in the air.

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  19. Thank you for visiting my site, marilyndallavalle.com. Below is Garret’s Key West Margarita recipe that I am giving away for visitors. Garret is a character in my books, Murder in Mystic, Murder in Newport and the upcoming Two Headed Snake of Key West.

    Garret’s Key West Margarita

    Fresh squeezed juice of 6 Key Limes
    1 jigger of silver tequila
    1 jigger of Triple Sec
    1 jigger of Rose’s lime juice

    Shake vigorously. Pour over ice.
    Float Β½ jigger of Grand Marnier on top

    Enjoy! Repeat as needed!

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  20. What a wonderfully diverse blog! How about some quotations from famous authors or poets? If you post any, please let me know and I’ll share them on my blog! (with credit, of course!)

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