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It’s official now!

I am proud to say, officially, that I’m a winner of the NanoWriMo 2014 challenge of 50,000 words!  I also want to congratulate every other participant, winner or not!

I’m still a little ways off finishing the book, but I’ve got a heck of a start on it, and will keep going at this pace ’till November 30th!

Winner 2014 badge

Winner of the 2014 Nano challenge!

 
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Posted by on November 20, 2014 in Author, Canadian-related Links, November, Publishing

 

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Apples and Computers!

Mac, also known as the McIntosh, or McIntosh Red, is an apple that  has red and green skin, a tart flavour, and tender white flesh, and ripens in late September.   It is also  considered an all-purpose apple, suitable both for cooking and eating raw.

Apple trees were first introduced to Canada at the Habitation at Port-Royal (now Port Royal, Annapolis County, Nova Scotia) as early as 1606 by French settlers. Following its introduction, apple cultivation spread inland.

The McIntosh’s discoverer, John McIntosh left his native Mohawk Valley home in New York State in 1796 to follow his love, Dolly Irwin, who had been taken to Upper Canada by her Loyalist parents. However, she had died by the time he found her.  He went on to settle as a farmer in Upper Canada. In 1801, he married Hannah Doran, and they farmed along the Saint Lawrence River until 1811 when McIntosh exchanged the land he had with his brother-in-law Edward Doran for a plot in Dundela, which is about 70km south of Ottawa, (the Canadian capital).  In around 1835, John McIntosh’s son Allan learned grafting; with this cloning the McIntoshes could maintain the distinctive properties of the fruit of the original tree.

McIntosh apples on a tree

McIntosh apples, origin: Dundela, Upper Canada, 1811

A house fire damaged the original McIntosh tree in 1894; it last produced fruit in 1908, and died and fell over in 1910.

Horticulturist William Tyrrell Macoun of the Central Experimental Farm in Ottawa is credited with popularizing the McIntosh in Canada. He stated the McIntosh needed “no words of praise”, that it was “one of the finest appearing and best dessert apples grown”.  The McIntosh made up 40% of the Canadian apple market by the 1960s.  Horticulturalists from the Upper Canada Village heritage park saved cuttings from the last known first-generation McIntosh graft before it died in 2011 for producing clones.

Photo of a Macintosh personal computer

Apple Inc.’s Macintosh line of personal computers was named after the fruit.

Did you know that Apple Inc. employee Jef Raskin named the Macintosh line of personal computers after the fruit?

Next time you are in the grocery store, why not pick a few of these delicious apples for a bite of Canadian history!

 

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Making Do …

In the tough Depression years, a newly hired 16-year-old working at Dare’s Kitchener factory was paid 17 cents an hour. Ontario’s minimum wage for adults was 22 cents an hour!

Photo of a food line in Toronto during the Great Depression

Food line at the Yonge Street Mission, 381 Yonge Street, Toronto, Canada, during the Great Depression in the 1930s.

The worldwide Great Depression that started in the United States in late 1929 quickly reached Canada, and was hit hard. Between 1929 and 1939, the gross national product dropped 40% (compared to 37% in the US). Unemployment reached 27% at the depth of the Depression in 1933. Many businesses closed, as corporate profits of $398 million in 1929 turned into losses of $98 million as prices fell. Farmers in the Prairies were especially hard hit by the collapse of wheat prices.  The Depression ended in 1939 as World War II began.

Denyse Baillargeon, historian and author, uses oral histories from 30 women to discover how housewives in the depression handled shortages of money and resources. Often they updated strategies their mothers used when they were growing up in poor families. Cheap foods were used, such as soups, beans and noodles. They purchased the cheapest cuts of meat—sometimes even horse meat—and recycled the Sunday roast into sandwiches and soups. They sewed and patched clothing, traded with their neighbors for outgrown items, and kept the house colder. New furniture and appliances were postponed until better days. These strategies, Baillargeon finds, show that women’s domestic labor—cooking, cleaning, budgeting, shopping, childcare—was essential to the economic maintenance of the family and offered room for economies. Most of her informants also worked outside the home, or took boarders, did laundry for trade or cash, and did sewing for neighbors in exchange for something they could offer. Extended families used mutual aid—extra food, spare rooms, repair-work, cash loans—to help cousins and in-laws.  Half of the Catholic women defied Church teachings and used contraception to postpone births—the number of births nationwide fell from 250,000 in 1930 to about 228,000 and did not recover until 1940.

If you would like to read Baillargeon’s book, click here, Making Do: Women, Family and Home in Montreal during the Great Depression.

 

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Snapshots of Canada’s Past: Armistice Day

tkmorin:

What a perfect post to honour our past and what we have to be thankful for today! -tkmorin

Originally posted on All About Canadian History:

Snapshots of Canada’s Past: History is more than just words on a screen or from a textbook; this series is a thematic look back at Canadian history through visual imagery.

Armistice Day
In 1918, on the eleventh hour, of the eleventh day, of the eleventh month, the Armistice of Compiègne came into effect, ending World War I. As a prelude to the Treaty of Versailles, its terms made it impossible for Germany to resume fighting. Germany agreed to turnover “2,500 heavy guns, 2,500 field guns, 25,000 machine guns, 1,700 airplanes and all submarines they possessed” in addition to a number of warships and  their prisoners of war. [x] The Armistice was signed in the Forest of Compiègne, about 60 km north of Paris in a railway carriage owned by French military commander Ferdinand Foch. Canada was not present, only representatives from France, Britain, and Germany were there. However…

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Mike Myers’ Math

Quote by Mike Myers

Mike Myers

Mike Myers, born on May 25, 1963 in Scarborough, Ontario, (that makes him 51 years old) is actor, comedian, writer, producer, and director. He married Robin Ruzan (1993 and divorced in 2007; currently married to Kelly Tisdale since 2010. He has 2 children. He began performing in commercials at age two, and at ten he made a commercial for British Columbia Hydro Electric. The rest is history.

 
 

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Image

John Candy’s Humour

John_Candy_Quote

 

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An Apple a Day …

Daniel David Palmer

A portrait of Daniel David Palmer (1845–1913).

I would like to introduce you to Daniel David Palmer (aka D.D. Palmer), the founder of chiropractic.

Daniel David Palmer or D.D. Palmer was born on March 7, 1845, in Pickering, Canada West (now is Ontario)  and died on October 20, 1913.

In 1865 Palmer moved to the United States, and around 1880 took up magnetic healing in Davenport, Iowa. After returning to Davenport, in 1895 Palmer met Harvey Lillard, a janitor whose hearing was impaired. Palmer claimed the man’s hearing was restored after manipulating his spine.

Palmer developed the theory that mis-alignment of the bones in the body was the basic underlying cause of all “dis-ease” and the majority of these mis-alignments were in the spinal column. In 1897 he opened the Palmer School of Chiropractic in Davenport and started teaching his techniques. Lawsuits followed, and after brief incarceration, Palmer sold the school to his son, B. J. Palmer. B. J. greatly expanded the school and the general knowledge of chiropractic. Palmer moved west, opening several new schools in Oklahoma, California, and Oregon. His relationship with his son was strained after this point.

Palmer died in Los Angeles in 1913 of typhoid fever.

To learn more about D.D. Palmer, I suggest a .pdf outlining D.D. Palmer’s Lifeline at National Institute of Chiropractic Research.

 

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