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Tag Archives: winter

Higher than Niagara Falls!

Canada boasts so many beautiful locations, for tourists and visitors alike.  We are all familiar with Niagara Falls, which borders Canada and the United States.  But in Quebec there is a special gem called Montmorency Falls and is 30 meters higher than Niagara Falls!

It is at the junction of Montmorency River and the St. Lawrence River, about 10 kilometres east of Quebec City.  It has captured people’s fascination and awe since the years of Champlain.  Like most of Canada’s geography, there is a different experience to be had if you visit in the summer or in the winter.  The following videos can show you its beauty more than my words ever could.  Enjoy them.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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My Top 5

It is said that the weather is something Canadians talk about a lot.  I find myself counting the weeks left to see Spring temperatures.  For today’s post, I decided to describe my top 5 weather stories of 2013.

Photo of a street in Alberta during the floods of 2013

Alberta Floods in 2013

 

1.  Alberta’s super flood of May/June washed across one-quarter of the province and through the heart of Calgary – the fourth largest city in Canada.  The damage losses and recovery costs from the flood to exceed $6 billion, including a record $2 billion in insured losses. Trees were literally skinned of their bark 10 metres above the ground by gravel and boulders barrelling along in rushing waters. In Calgary’s downtown, 4,000 businesses were impacted and 3,000 buildings were flooded. Water rose at the Saddledome up to the 10th row. In Stampede Park, stables and barns were under more than two metres of water.

2. Toronto’s Torrent of July  when the city faced two separate storm cells – one on the heels of the other – that slowed then stalled over the city. The one-two weather punch delivered more rain in two hours than Toronto usually sees during an entire July. Exacerbating the storm’s impact was the 38 mm of rain that had fallen on the city the day before. The Insurance Bureau of Canada estimated the July 8 storm costs at close to $1 billion in damages – the most expensive natural disaster ever in Ontario. Videos captured cars bobbing up and down on streets and highways, sinkholes opening up and snakes swimming inside stalled commuter trains. Thousands were stranded, necessitating rescue by boat in some instances. About 500,000 households were without power for as much as days.

3. February Fog on Fogo. No one got off Newfoundland’s Fogo Island for five days at the end of the month because heavy ice conditions and dense fog shut down ferry and air travel. The Island’s school closed, stores ran low on supplies and residents were unable to attend off-island medical appointments. Feelings of isolation and frustration only increased as strong winds blew more fog in on the Island instead of blowing it away.

4. The Nightmare during Christmas, happened the weekend before Christmas as a vigorous winter storm coated parts of eastern Canada with a thick mixture of snow, ice pellets, rain and freezing rain that plunged large parts of the region into days of cold and darkness. Thick glaze left roads and sidewalks slick and dangerous and knocked down power lines, leaving over 500,000 people without electricity. Though

Downed trees on a road

Nightmare During Christmas

picturesque, the Christmas storm created extremely dangerous conditions as fallen power lines intertwined with broken tree limbs dangled across streets and property. The affected area extended from Lake Huron, across the Greater Toronto Area, east along Highway 401 to Cornwall, through Quebec’s Eastern Townships and across the central Maritimes centred on the Bay of Fundy. The epicentre of the freezing rain was in southern Ontario between Niagara and Trenton where between 20 and 30 mm fell – more than two-year’s worth in two days. It crippled North American transportation at one of the busiest travel times of the year.

5. Prairie Perpetual Winter. Environment Canada considers the months of December through February as winter. Tell that to Canadians on the Prairies, where cold, snow and ice went on for seven months from October 2012 to April 2013, inclusive – the longest and coldest period in 16 years. Snows came early, stayed late and never disappeared. As a result, it felt and looked like winter from before Thanksgiving to a month after Easter. And with deep snow on the ground any warm-up was stalled until late May. Persistent cold – between March 1 and April 30, the average temperature in Regina was -8°C; eleven degrees colder than the previous year and the coldest period in 113 years. The prolonged winter was especially costly for governments. By the end of January, Saskatchewan had already spent $6 million more than usual on snow and ice control with much more to come.

I guess this year’s winter isn’t so bad after all.

 

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Did you know … ?

Do you know which Canadian city, with over 1 million inhabitants, gets the most snow in the world?

Scroll down to see the answer …

English: Snow on the mountains of Southern Cal...

(Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Montreal, Quebec. This city averages 250 cm of snow a year.  It shares the same output as St. Petersburg, Russia!

This according to a great book: Canadian Geographic Quiz Book!

 

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Record Hot Winter Days In Canada

This is my second post for today.  This one is lighthearted and short, but I thought interesting.  Enjoy!

Celsius Fahrenheit Interval Conversion.jpg

Celsius Fahrenheit Interval Conversion.jpg (Photo credit: hmcotterill)

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Okay, so it’s ice-raining outside today.  Hardly warm, much less hot.  But I decided to check out record-making hot winter days in Canada.  This is what I found:

Despite a generally chilly climate, the temperature in these large cities has risen above 20 °C (68 °F) during winter.

Calgary                                             22.6°C                  Feb 27, 1992
St. Catharines – Niagara                    21.9°C                   Dec 3, 1982
Hamilton                                           20.7°C                   Dec 3, 1982
Abbotsford                                        20.6°C                   Feb 27, 1968
Windsor                                           20.4°C                    Feb 26, 2000
Toronto                                            20.0°C                    Dec 3, 1982

Yeah, I figured you’d be as surprised as me.  I got these at a site I just found this morning.  It’s at Current Results, Research news and science facts.

 

 
21 Comments

Posted by on February 27, 2013 in Canadian-related Links, On This Day, Weather

 

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A Box Of Boughs

blue christmas

(Photo credit: 19melissa68)

Christmas 1960 saw its first aluminum trees in Canada!

Shipped from the United States, they can be purchased anywhere from $5 to $20.  This new “space-age” tree has many advantages: they are fireproof, they never shed needles, and they can be made to look good, too.

Aluminum trees’ fad lasted about a decade. They came in different sizes and colours: from table-top to touch-the-ceiling height; from pink, blue, gold, and silver.

“Aluminum trees figure prominently in the 1965 animated classic, A Charlie Brown Christmas,” writes CBC Archives.

 

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