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Pontiac Plays Deadly Game of Lacrosse!

04 Jun
Pontiac (Indian chief)

Pontiac (Indian chief) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

During the World Series, Stanley Cup, and football playoffs, sport commentators often describe a certain game as being “crucial.”

Perhaps the most crucial game ever played in Canada was one of lacrosse, which took place on June 4, 1763 at Michilimackinac.

Indian Chief Pontiac had vowed to wipe the British off the face of the earth. Many tribes resented Britain’s taking over Canada from France by the Treaty of Paris in 1763 — many of them had never even seen British redcoats until after the fall of Montreal, when General Amherst sent troops to take over Detroit and Michilimackinac.  (Michilimackinac was an important fort at the junction of Lakes Huron and Michigan.  It has been pre-serviced as a historic site near on the longest bridges in the world.)

June 4 was the birthday of King George III, and the Indians arranged to play a game of Lacrosse outside the fort.  A great many female Indians who were there as spectators were hiding tomahawks and knives under their blankets. The gate of the fort was open and nearly all the members of the garrison were watching the game.  The Indians worked the play closer and closer to the gate, and suddenly took their weapons from them and began the massacre.

The troops were taken completely by surprise, probably not having heard about Pontiac’s treachery at Detroit on May 7.  While some of the Indians killed the soldiers outside the gate, others dashed inside and massacred the people there.  Few escaped.

It was part of what the distinguished historian, Francis Parkman called, “the conspiracy of Pontiac.”  Before it was brought under control, 2,000 British, including women and children, were killed along the frontier. Britain  decided to send an army to North America to protect the colonies.  The catch was that King George and his ministers demanded that the  colonists should bear the cost!  This led to the imposition of the Stamp Act, the duty on tea and other forms of taxation.  The American Revolutionary War was the result.

Britain put down the Indians for the time being, but lost the United States! The game of lacrosse at Michilimackinac was certainly more “crucial” than any game in the Stanley Cup or World Series!

Want to read more about this event?  I have a few recommendations for you. A good place to begin is My North.com, and then What is the Ojibwe Warrior all About?. Then there’s Serpents of the Sky, and then finally, Preppies vs. Indians on an old American playing field for a very interesting article.

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12 responses to “Pontiac Plays Deadly Game of Lacrosse!

  1. seeker

    June 4, 2013 at 11:24 pm

    Long live Pontiac!

     
  2. L. Marie

    June 4, 2013 at 11:02 am

    Wow. Absolutely chilling account.

     
    • tkmorin

      June 4, 2013 at 11:17 am

      Doesn’t make you happy we’re living in “modern times” as opposed to back then? I can’t imagine living and being prepared for a fight at any time, even during a game!

       
  3. Professor VJ Duke

    June 4, 2013 at 9:53 am

    Wow, Pontiac was a beast!

     
  4. weggieboy

    June 4, 2013 at 8:17 am

    Sorry for the typos. I’ll let them roll insterad of finding them one by one, and puttiong up yet another “update”. Fingers are a bit uncooperative today.

     
    • tkmorin

      June 4, 2013 at 10:02 am

      Oh, I get those too some days! 😀

       
  5. weggieboy

    June 4, 2013 at 8:15 am

    “history”

     
  6. weggieboy

    June 4, 2013 at 8:14 am

    …but not more important than the World Cup final, if a bit messier! Thanks for an incredible post today. This is exactly what I enjoy about your blog: The histories of our countries are intertwined in ways that don’t always come out in the history books. This an incident that wasn’t in any hostory I ewver read, but it clearly is a significanty event on both sides of the border.

     
    • tkmorin

      June 4, 2013 at 9:59 am

      Yes, this venue (the Internet) is certainly good for writing about some event or history that chocolate books do not, or can not. Plus, I have no censorship to tell me how to write!

      Thank you for your kind words! 🙂

       

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